Two names, many shared histories


Lawson

These articles relate to research into the Lawson families of Whitby and Brough Hall, Yorkshire.

  • Who’s who in the Lawson family? : part 1 “Lords of the Manor”

    The Lawson family history is complicated and has been subject of disputes over the centuries ( see post ‘Discord over Inheritance’). This first list indicates the line of the Lawsons who inherited estates and property and who were given the status of baronets which had been recognised ‘officially’.

    EDMUND Lawson , Died 1551 Esquire of Byker & West Matsen manors in Northumberland & Durham
    Married Margaret Swynhowe
    Son and heir:

    RALPH 1547-1623 Heir to above estates.
    Married Elizabeth, heir to Manor of Burgh ( Brough) near Catterick, Yorkshire. Knighted by James I in 1603
    Son & heir:

    ROGER who died in his father’s lifetime c 1613/14. Married Dorothy Constable of Burton Constable Family, Yorkshire.
    Son and heir to his grandfather Ralph’s estates:

    HENRY 1602-1635 Married Ann
    Various children including
    JAMES Inherited Burgh( Brough) but only briefly, as he died young.
    HENRY. Inherited from his brother James. He was a Colonel in the Royalist Army during the Civil War and died at the battle of Melton Mowbray in 1644. He had one daughter only.
    His Heir:

    JOHN LAWSON, 1st BARONET of Brough Hall, died 1698. Inherited from his brother Henry. He was a Captain of horse in the Royalist Army. His Estates were confiscated by the Parliamentarians after they had won the Civil War and he went into exile with his family. Upon the restoration of the monarchy his estates were restored and he was made a baronet in 1665 by Charles II.
    Married Catherine Howard, (1637-1668), sister of Charles Ist Earl of Carlisle.
    They had many children but only two surviving sons who married and had issue:

    1.HENRY 2nd BARONET (1653-1726). 2. WiLLIAM. Esq of City of York
    Married Elizabeth. D 1728
    Son: Son:
    JOHN. 3rd BARONET (1689-1739). George
    This line continues in Lawson: part2

    His son& heir:

    HENRY 4th BART(1712-1769) married Anastasia Maire, heiress.

    His son & heir
    JOHN 5th BART (1744-1811).
    No male heirs so title and estates pass to 5th Bart’s younger brother who was:

    HENRY (“Maire” Lawson) 6th BART (1750-1834)
    On his death, he had no male heirs to succeed. The estate passed to his great nephew through the female line, William Wright, who assumed the name Lawson. The first baronetcy lapsed but in 1841 William was created a baronet in the second creation:

    WILLIAM (“Wright”) Lawson (1796-1865) 1st BART in second creation
    His heir:

    JOHN (1829-1910) 2nd BART in ditto

    His heir:
    HENRY Joseph (1877-1947). 3rd BART in ditto. Married Ursula Mary Howard, of Corby Castle Cumbria.

    His heir:
    RALPH Henry (1905-1975). 4th BART in ditto. He had no male heirs so Brough Castle was left to his two daughters, jointly.

    His younger brother inherited the title of baronet and the seat moved to Corby Castle:
    WILLIAM HOWARD-LAWSON (1907-1990) 5th BART in ditto.
    His son and heir:
    JOHN PHILIP Howard-Lawson (b 1934) 6th BART in ditto. He assumed the use of the Howard name and arms in 1962 by Royal License. He then resumed the use of the Lawson name in 1992.
    He sold Corby Castle in 1994.

    His son is:
    PHILIP WILLIAM HOWARD

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  • Garbutts of Whitby pre19th century
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    Captain William Garbutt was born in 1803. His mother’s name is on his indenture ( see previous post) where she is describes as ‘widow of York’.

    At the time of this post, her maiden name is unknown, but she appears to have died 3 years after William was indentured, in 1819, at the age of 55. This means that she was born in 1764. Eleanor’s husband is recorded in parish register as Zachariah, a name which was to recur several times within the Garbutt family. Zachariah Garbutt was a mariner ( a seaman or fisherman) of Whitby, born in 1752. He died in 1805, when this youngest son, William, was only 2 years old.

    From the parish records it appears that Zachariah and Eleanor had 6 children in total, of whom only possibly 3 survived. To complicate matters they appear to have given their first two children who died young, the same name as their sixth and final child: William. Looking at parish registers of this time and later, this seems to have been a common practice, but one which makes it difficult for those who are tracing family members!

    The couple’s first child ( William I) was born in 1785 and lived for a year, dying in 1786. It is likely that the next child ( William 2) was born in 1788 and that he too died, though to date his burial registration has not yet been uncovered. The third child was also a son, named Zachariah, born in 1791. He survived into adulthood and died at sea in 1833. Another child, Samuel, followed in 1795 but he too died after a year, in 1796. Then the couple had a daughter, Dorethy/ Dorothy, born in 1797, (date of death unknown as yet) Finally, in 1803, William Garbutt (later Captain) was born.

    This last William became a master mariner and married Jane Lawson, dying with her and their infant child in 1837 in the shipwreck of the Canton. William and Jane were related by both marriage and blood to Zachariah and Mary. Zachariah was William’s brother, born in 1791 and therefore 12 years older than William. He had married Jane Lawson’s sister, Mary, who had been born in 1799 and was therefore 9 years senior to Jane. Given that Zachariah Garbutt the father died in 1805 it is likely that Zachariah Garbutt, the elder brother who was also a mariner, took charge of supporting his widowed mother and her youngest child. It is also likely that Jane and William came to know each other through their married older siblings.

    Zachariah and Mary had several children, one of whom ( John Lawson Garbutt) also died at sea, like his father, and his uncle and aunt and baby cousin. The frequent occurrence of death at sea in the history of both the Garbutt and Lawson families through the 19th and even into the 20th century, shows how precarious this means of livelihood was. It would not be be surprising if other similar deaths were to be revealed in the record going back from Zachariah and Eleanor.

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  • Architectural description of Brough Hall, Yorkshire
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    L322322

    BROUGH WITH ST GILES BROUGH PARK
    SE 29 NW
    4/12 Brough Hall
    19.12.51
    GV I

    Country house, now 10 residences. C15, altered and extended c1575, early C17, c1730, c1770 and mid C19. Originally for de Burgh family, after c1575 for Lawson family, early C18 work possibly by William Wakefield, late C15 work by Thomas Atkinson.

    Rubble, part roughcast and sandstone ashlar, with Westmorland slate roofs. Central 3-storey, 3-bay C15 tower house with cross-passage and hall, with C16 2-storey 1-bay side bays (west one a solar wing) and rear stair tower.

    To east and west, projecting C18 2 storey 5-bay blocks, east block with rear chapel wing of early C18. Main north elevation: earlier work refronted C18. Central 3 bays: outer bays narrower, gabled and slightly breaking forward.

    Central bay: leaved 6-panel doors in architrave with C20 Doric portico and, above, Ionic Venetian window in round arched recess with voussoirs aligned to courses. Other windows in central block are round-arched sashes with glazing bars in architraves, with 6-panel part-glazed door below upper part of window to ground floor left (giving access to cross-passage) and half-size on second floor.

    Modillions to cornice and gable pediments. Parapet with moulded coping. Flanking bays have sash windows with glazing bars in architraves, moulded cornices and plain parapets. Side blocks elevationally match the flanking bays, first and fourth bays of left block being blind, and have 2-bay inner returns. Corniced stacks to right end of central range, other stacks C20 brick.

    South elevation (rear), central range: C15 rubble with quoins, blocked C16 mullion and transom windows, early C18 refenestration. Right bay projects slightly and has C16 studded board cross-passage door in quoined chamfered surround with triangular head; to its right an external garderobe projects buttress-like with one vent and stone roof; to its left blocked single-light window openings formerly to garderobes of upper floor, chute at bottom now blocked. In central bay and on first and second floors of right bay, sash windows with glazing bars in architraves with tripartite keystones.

    Staircase tower to left: ground-floor blocked single-light window; first- floor pedimented Tuscan Venetian window on balustraded dado, above it the head of a 2-light mullion window; second-floor Diocletian window, above it the head of a 2-light mullion window.

    Right return of staircase tower: ground-floor blocked quoined chamfered doorway with triangular head; quoined surrounds of 2-light mullion windows on ground, first and second floors, the
    last open. Solar wing to left: on left, part-glazed door in architrave with panelled pilasters, cornice capitals and keyed round arch: above, on first floor, a sash window with glazing bars in keyed architrave; to right, c1900 2-storey canted bay window with mullions and transoms. Left return of solar wing: external stack, corbelled out on first floor. To left again, west block has large central segmental bay with part-glazed door in console corniced architrave and Tuscan Venetian window above. In flanking bays on both floors, oculi in ashlar surrounds. Interior: central block, ground floor: hall has C16 panelling with fluted frieze and modillion cornice, altered in C18; C16 ribbed ceiling with small pendants and,on plasterwork of frieze and cross-beams, armorial motifs commemorating marriage of Elizabeth de Burgh and Ralph Lawson c1575.

    First floor: 2 small rooms (now 1) over cross-passage with C16 ribbed ceilings with small pendants and armorial motifs; good early C18 woodwork in great chamber. Second floor: fragments of C16 panelling and frieze matching those in hall. Staircase tower: excellent c1730 oak staircase with turned balusters of gadroon-on-vase design; superb first-floor ceiling with modillion cornice, corner rosettes and richly-decorated oval panel; second-floor room with masons’ marks on C16 stone doorway and mullion window.

    Solar wing: on ground floor, good early C18 bolection panelling with 2 pedimented chimney-pieces.

    East-block: ground floor: 2 late-C18 tripartite stone fireplaces. Late C18 cantilevered stone staircase and turned baluster staircase. Chapel wing has good early C18 woodwork and plasterwork including gallery balustrade, also chimney-piece brought from great chamber. West block: ground floor: Adam-style fireplace moved to new position, coat of arms of Lawson family over original position of fireplace; Adam style decorated plasterwork to ceiling; staircase hall with central shell niche flanked by recesses; semi elliptical cantilevered stone staircase.

    Brough Hall passed by marriage from the de Burghs to the Lawsons c1575.

    The Lawson family were recusants, and in addition to their private chapel, built the Church of St Paulinus (qv) in the grounds of Brough Hall. John Cornforth, “Brough Hall, Yorkshire”,

    Country Life (1967), pp 894-8 and 948-52; VCH i, p 301

    Listing NGR: SE2156497826

     

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  • The Lawson and Ingleby connection
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    Recusant* families were, understandably, in close knit communities and the local gentry knew each other well, and often intermarried.
    One connection to the Lawsons was recently discovered on a visit to Ripley Castle, near Harrogate, North Yorkshire. The castle is still owned by the Ingelby family who have had possession of it for around 700 years! In the 16th and early 17th centuries the family were staunch Catholics, and indeed the family knew several of those who were involved in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 against James I of England ( VI of Scotland). There is a priest hole in the Castle, only discovered in the 20th century.

    A portrait of a lady in a red dress hangs in the same room as the Priest hole and it is thought to be of a Mrs or Lady Lawson. She was not of the Ingleby family but her link is with Catherine Ingleby, wife of Sir William Ingleby (1546-1617). Both Lady Lawson and Lady Ingelby were friends and had been affected by the campaign, begun in 1592, against recusant wives of gentlemen who had conformed. With other wives, these ladies had been placed with Protestant families in an attempt to convert them, but this ploy had failed. They were brought to court in spring 1592 and were remanded to Sheriff Hutton Castle, a prison near York. During her imprisonment, Mrs Lawson gave birth to one of her nine children, and this is said to have nearly died in the process.

    Lady Lawson ( then Mrs Lawson) was married to Sir Ralph Lawson of Brough Hall. Her son was Roger Lawson of Heaton who married Dorothy Constable who was connected to the Holderness family of Yorkshire, all Catholics. Dorothy and her husband lived with his parents at Brough Hall for a while. Dorothy’s mother, Margaret Constable, was imprisoned alongside Mrs Lawson and Catherine Ingleby.

    In 1593 the authorities received a petition from several husbands, for their release. Lady Lawson and Lady Ingelby were released in 1594.

    The photo below is of Ripley Castle, North Yorkshire

    * the term ‘recusant’ refers to all those who broke regulations and laws by refusing to attend services in the authorised Church of England. They were heavily fined for their refusal, and included Catholics as well as Protestant non conformers.

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  • Letter from Frances(Fanny) Jackson nee Lawson 1875
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    Transcript of letter from Frances Jackson ( nee Lawson), sister of Jane Lawson and aunt of Zachariah Garbutt, sent in 1875. She was 69 and he was 44 years old when she wrote this letter:

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    3 Friar Street
    Hartlepool
    Oct 16/ 75

    Dear Zach,

    I promised to send you a photo of dear Harry – I have only been at home a few days or would have performed my promise sooner – on Monday I was sent for to Mrs Burdon who had lost her youngest daughter Mary by sudden death. I have been there all the week. Mary was quite well on Sunday and had written a letter of condolence to a Lady who had lost her husband he died very suddenly also – he went home from his office saying how very ill he felt and just had time to seat himself down on the sofa and expired directly – he had not been long married.

    Mary Burden wrote her letter on Sunday night partly intending to finish it on Monday- but on Monday morning she was a corpse she was only a delicate girl but they thought she was gaining strength and was very cheerful and lively and had been for some time – so you see how uncertain is life. Poor Mrs Burden is in great distress. I was very much pleased to see you and your family looking so well. I thought there was great credit due to Dorothy in the management of her house and family – I thought they would take all her time to make, mend,wash and bake for you all – it also shewed your care dear Zach in supplying the necesaries requested for which I am truly glad to see you getting on again.

    I am sure you will be pleased with dear Harry’s photo. I pray daily that God will give you grace to imitate his virtues and I know it was his prayer that you may come back to the Church and your dear little family along with you – you know they were all baptised Catholics- do let them live as Catholics – you setting the example and take them with you – that when you appear before Almighty God however sudden he may call you- you may be able to give a good account of your stewardship and thus save your own Soul – excuse me presuming to say this much to you but I feel it is what your dear Mother would wish me to say to you in her name could she speak to me – she was called suddenly away and had not the opurtunity of training you to God. I hope dear Zach you will take what I have said in the spirit that is meant and see that it is my great anxiety for your Souls welfare – may you fight and conquer and gain for yourself and family a happy Eternity in the kingdom of heaven – may it be your happy lot is the prayer of
    Your Affectionate Aunt
    F Jackson

     

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  • Another tragedy at sea
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    John (1885-1910) was the eldest son of John Lawson of Whitby (1855-1924) who had become Master of the Union workhouse and who later styled himself ‘Sir John’ and 10th Baronet ‘de

    jure’ of Brough.

    John was drowned on September 12th 1910 off Tuticorin, India. He was second officer of The SS Clan Leslie.

    He is commemorated on the Lawson gravestone in Whitby church, along with his ancestors.

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  • Brough Hall
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    The following description is taken from the year 1890

    Situated near Catterick and Richmond in North Yorkshire, in an area known as Swaledale.

    In 1890 the township of Catterick embraced 1,694 acres of land on the south bank of the river Swale, belonging chiefly to Sir John Lawson, Bart.,Brough Hall. He is also lord of the manor.

    After the Norman conquest the manor and lands in this area were given to Alan the Red, first earl of Richmond, and were subsequently held by the De Burghs of Brough Hall. In the 17th century they passed, by marriage, to Ralph Lawson,Esq,. This gentleman was knighted by King James I. He was the son of Edmund Lawson of the Cramlington Hall Lawsons in Northumberland

    The first baronet of Brough Hall was Sir John Lawson (1635-1698) who was awarded the title by Charles II in 1665 after the Restoration of the monarchy and to acknowledge the privations John Lawson had suffered during, and after, the Civil War.

    The De Burghs and the Lawsons are buried in the chapel ( originally a chantry) of St James within the Church of St Anne. Here there are three ancient inscribed brasses to members of the former family, and several handsome tablets to those of the latter.

    Brough is a township of woods and meadows lying on the banks of the Swale. It comprises an area of 1,082 acres, the property of Sir John Lawson, Bart

    The Hall is a handsome stone mansion erected in the reign of Charles I and subsequently enlarged by the addition of two side wings by Sir John Lawson in the 18th century.

    A short distance from the Hall is the Catholic church, erected in 1834-7 at the expense of the baronet.

    (From Bulmer’s ‘History and Directory of North Yorkshire (1890))

    .

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  • Transcript of Whitby Lawson gravestone
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    The Lawson gravestone in St Mary’s churchyard is more or less obliterated. This is its transcript.

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    Sacred to the memory of

    PHILIP LAWSON died 11 June 1833, aged 104 years

    ELIZABETH -wife of JOHN LAWSON, draper, died 24 th Dec 1833 aged 63 years

    Also the above JOHN LAWSON died 2nd February 1855 aged 90 years

    Also JANE- daughter of JOHN and ELIZABETH LAWSON, with husband WILLIAM GARBUTT (master -mariner) and infant child, who were lost in brig ‘CANTON’ on Brian Island -October 1837

    Also JOHN, eldest son of Sir John and Lady Lawson, and great, great grandson of the above Philip Lawson, who was accidently drowned 12 Sept 1910 in India

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  • The Canton
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    The ‘Canton’ was owned by John Lawson ( the elder). Its master was registered as ‘William Garbutt’. William was born on 1803 and died in 1837. He married one of the daughters of John, Jane Lawson.

    The ‘Canton’ was a square-rigged coppered brig and its net tonnage was 273. John Lawson bought and registered it in 1830, the year of Jane’s marriage to William. Its certificate of registery was number 2 for that year. The ship was built in Whitby but was surveyed on the Clyde. It had a crew of twelve.

    On the 14th November 1837 the ‘Canton’ was on a return voyage from Gaspe to Britain. It ran into difficulties off the north west of Brion Island, part of the Magdalen Islands. On board were Captain William Garbutt, his wife Jane, and their baby William with 10 crew members. William, Jane and the baby left the floundering ship “in the gig” with four of the crew. They were never heard of again. The mate and five of the crew reached Magdalen island in the ‘jolly’ boat.

    Word of the disaster reached Halifax, Novia Scotia, and then Lloyd’s insurers in London in December 1837. However, the gravestone in Whitby records that the loss of the ‘Canton’ occurred in October.

    A model of the Canton was said to exist within the Garbutt family in the early part of the 20th century, but it appears to have been lost or thrown away at that time.

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  • Discord over inheritance? Claims to the baronetcy of Brough Hall.

    Discord over inheritance?

    The Lawson baronetcy of Brough had two creations. The first was in 1660 and the second was after 1834 when the sixth baronet of the first creation died, leaving no direct heirs.

    Later, in 1907, John Lawson of Whitby (1885-1924) a descendant of the 1st Baronet announced in the local Whitby paper that he was resuming the title of ‘Sir John’ by right of his descent. The full text of the notice he had published is below.

    COPY OF NOTICE PUBLISHED IN THE PRESS

    ​Notice is hereby given that I, John Lawson of Whitby Co. Yorks, have by deed poll dated the 24th of June, 1907 assumed as my lawful right the rank style and title of Sir John Lawson of Whitby in the County of York, Baronet which rank style and title was conferred upon my ancestor Sir John Lawson of Burgh Hall Co. York aforesaid by King Charles II by Letters Patent dated 6 July, 1665, the said Baronetcy having descended regularly to the late Sir Henry Lawson of Burgh Hall who died sine prole in 1834 (when the title became vested in the issue of William Lawson Esquire, the second surviving son Of Sir John Lawson 1st Baronet) leaving John Lawson the Elder of Whitby aforesaid Gentleman great-grandson and heir of the said William Lawson, his heir at law. I the said John Lawson of Whitby aforesaid being the great-grandson, and heir at law of the said John Lawson the Elder, Gentleman.

    The aforesaid deed poll was executed in lieu of recording my pedigree in the College of Arms as required by the order of his late Majesty King George III dated sixth December, 1782, such order having been subsequently revoked by his said Majesty so far related to Baronetcy’s created prior to 1783. Dated 24th June 1907,

    (Signed) John Lawson.

    Witness: David Gordon Walker
    34 Esk Terrace
    Whitby
    Accountant.

    The notice refers to ‘John Lawson the Elder of Whitby’ as the great grandfather of the 1907 John Lawson. In the Garbutt/ Lawson family tree, he is also the great grandfather of William Garbutt (1862-1944). William and John Lawson (1907) were therefore second cousins.

    Who was the rightful heir to the Baronetcy?

    Dating from the 1830s or even before that, there had been long-running resentment and dispute over who was the legitimate heir to the baronetcy of Brough. The lines of inheritance had been clear, from the 1st baronet up to the 5th baronet, Sir John (1712-1781).
    The 6th baronet (Henry Maire Lawson 1750-1834) was the younger brother of the 5th baronet. The 5th baronet had married twice but his only living heirs were both female. The 6th baronet succeeded to the title in 1811 but had left no issue when he died in 1834. However, he had made a will naming his successor as his great nephew, William Wright (1796-1865). William was the grandson of the 5th baronet through one of the latter’s two daughters, Elizabeth. He adopted the name Lawson when he inherited the Brough estates in 1834 and became the 1st baronet in the second creation in 1841. He strengthened his claim to the estates by marrying his second cousin,Clarinda Catherine Lawson, granddaughter and heiress to John Lawson of Bath, the younger brother of the 4th Baronet. Thus, both William and Clarinda were the great grandchildren of the 3rd baronet, but neither were direct male descendants.

    This being the case, there was likely to have been discontent amongst direct male descendants of the 1st baronet when the estates and titles were bestowed upon William Wright. The 1st baronet, John, had had several sons and daughters but his fourth son, William, was actually his second surviving son. This William, “Esquire of the city of York”, inherited an annuity of £30 from his father in 1698 and then £10 from his brother Henry (2nd baronet) in 1726. In 1719 William enrolled his estates by deed and his will was dated 1728.

    William’s great-grandson, was the first John Lawson of Whitby (‘The Elder’ 1756-1855). He must have felt that he was entitled to the title as he styled himself ‘Sir John’, even though he was a tradesperson ( a draper). However, it was his great grandson who published his intention to be called ‘Sir John’ in the press in 1907 ( see above). The father of John Lawson the Elder had been Philip who was the great grandson of the 1st baronet via William (Esquire of York) and Philip had lived to the remarkable age of 104. ‘Old’ Philip ( as he was known) was born in 1729, a year after William Lawson, his grandfather, had died, and only 31 years after the death of the 1st baronet. So Old Philip and his family would be very aware of their close kinship with the 1st Baronet. Indeed, because of his longevity, Philip would have been alive at the time that the estates and title passed to the 5th and 6th baronets, and he would surely have known that neither had a direct male heir to inherit. Philip died a year before the 6th baronet, but his son and family must have been very aware of their own entitlement and also the will ( dated 1726) of the 2nd baronet who had entailed “his estates to his male heirs forever”

    In 1907 Philip Hugh Lawson (b 1887) published the family tree that he had been researching on behalf of the claim of his uncle, John Lawson of Whitby, to the baronetcy (see quoted text above). In 1904 and 1907 press reports and letters to newspapers appear to show a heightened interest in this research and this branch of the family assumed by deed poll the ‘name, rank and title of ……baronet. This was “de jure” ( i.e. as a right of law, rather than a fact of law). Brough Hall and its estates actually belonged to the descendants of William Wright Lawson (1st baronet of second creation). Nevertheless, John Lawson of Whitby styled himself 10th baronet. His son Philip (b 1891) was styled the 11th baronet, and his grandson John Philip of Hull (b 1926) was the 12th baronet.

    An ironic footnote?

    The rather ironic footnote to these disputes and claims is that, in recent times, there has been discord within baronetcy of the second creation, that is amongst the descendants of William Wright Lawson (1796-1865). This branch married again into the Howard family and were known later as Howard-Lawson. Their seat was at Corby Castle in Cumbria and the 6th baronet of the second creation is Sir John Philip Howard Lawson (b1934). He was in a long running legal dispute with his son Philip (b1961) over the sale of Corby Castle which, Philip claimed, had been illegally sold by his father. However, Philip lost the costly case in March 2012.

    What happened to Brough Hall?

    Brough Hall was inherited by the two daughters of the 4th baronet of the second creation (1905-1975). At the present time its ownership has not been established by the current writer but there is promotional video that shows some of its current interior, available on utube.

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    Picture of ‘Sir’ John Lawson (1855-1924), master of Union Workhouse, Whitby.

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JOHN LAWSON, 1st BARONET of Brough Hall, died 1698. Inherited from his brother Henry. He was a Captain of horse in the Royalist Army. His Estates were confiscated by the Parliamentarians after they had won the Civil War and he went into exile with his family. Upon the restoration of the monarchy his estates were restored and he was made a baronet in 1665 by Charles II.
Married Catherine Howard, (1637-1668), sister of Charles Ist Earl of Carlisle.
They had many children but only two surviving sons who married and had issue:

1.Henry 2nd BARONET (1653-1726). His will entails his estates “to his maleheirs forever”.

2. WILLIAM (the only other surviving married son) described as “a gentleman ( esquire) of York”. In 1698 his father, the first Baronet, bequeathed him an annuity of £30 in his will. His brother Henry, the 2nd Baronet, bequeathed him £10 in his will in 1726.
His son:

GEORGE “of Egton in County of York.”
His son:
PHILIP ( 1729-1833)
Later known as ‘old Philip’, presumably because of his longevity (he was 104 when he died!).
He was the great-grandson of 1st baronet, John, and grandson of William Lawson.
He married Barbara Elders of Egton and had a number of children by her.
When she died he married Jane Hoggart and had one daughter by her.

JOHN Lawson ‘the Elder’ (1756-1855) Draper of Bridgestreet in Whitby, son of Philip, gt,get grandson of 1st baronet, John. Father-in-law of Cpt William Garbutt who married his daughter, Jane. Later named as 7th baronet “de jure” ( ie by right, but not in law)

JOHN (The younger) (1795-1874) also draper of Bridgestreet, Whitby. Married Ann White. His eldest surviving son was:

JOHN NICHOLAS (1823-1898) married Eliza Ann Rook.
His eldest sons were twins, John and William. John was the elder twin:

JOHN (1855-1924). In 1907 he claimed the title of “Sir John” and claimed to be the 10th baronet. He married Rebecca Storm. He was the Master of the Union Workhouse at Whitby, she was the Mistress. His portrait hangs in the Pannet Gallery in Whitby. He was an amateur painter/artist. He had 4 sons: John, Philip, William (portrait by his father in Pannet Gallery) and Henry (Harry). The eldest was:

JOHN (1885-1910) He was a sailor and drowned off the coast of India. He is commemorated on the Lawson gravestone at St Mary’s Whitby ( now eroded).
PHILIP : the heir. (1891-1962)known as the 11th Bart. Served with his brothers in the Great War. His brother,Harry (1895-1916) died in that War. His brother William is referred to below*
Married Doris Boulby. His son:

JOHN PHILIP (1926-) known as the 12th Bart. Married Joan Alice Robinson.
His son:
DAVID PHILIP (b 1957) married Pamela Giblin

WILLIAM (1893-1946) brother of the above PHILIP. Of Whitby then St Albans. He was co-founder of Faith Craft works and designed and made ecclesiastical features and church fittings, including stained glass windows.
He married Winifred Maude Corble. His son was:

JOHN Nicholas (1932-2009). An artist and master craftsman, also. He had many prestigious ecclesiastical commissions, including the window in the west wall of Henry VII chapel, Westminster Abbey, and a window in Ripon Cathedral. Also commissions in the Middle East.
Spouse: Frances Baker. Children:
, Rebecca (b1969), Helena (b 1970) Dominic (b 1972)

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ZACHARIAH Garbutt (1752-1805) mariner of Whitby, father of Cpt William Garbutt

Married to………
ELEANOR Garbutt (1764-1819) wife of above and mother of Cpt Wm Garbutt

Surviving Children of the above couple with spouses:

1.Zachariah Garbutt (1791-1833) eldest surviving son of above, brother of Cpt Wm Garbutt

Married to……

Mary Lawson (1799- 1883) wife of above, sister in law of Cpt Wm Garbutt.
Children of this couple: several, including John Lawson Garbutt, seaman, born 1829, died in 1859, lost at sea on ship ‘Rosshire’.

2.WILLIAM Garbutt (1803-1837) captain, of ‘Canton’ died In wreck, Canada.

Married to……

JANE Lawson (1808-1837) died in wreck of ‘Canton’ with husband and infant son.

Children of the above couple….

3. ZACHARIAH (‘James’) Garbutt (1831-1913) eldest son of Cpt Wm Garbutt

married Dorothy Atkinson (1834-1914)
LUCY Garbutt (1834-37) Sister of above, died in infancy

WILLIAM Garbutt (1836-37) infant brother of above, died with parents in wreck of ‘Canton’.

4.WILLIAM Garbutt ( 1862-1944) son of Zachariah & Dorothy Atkinson grandson of Cpt William.
married Margaret Metcalf (1864-1951)
Children:
Ethel Garbutt and……..

5.WILLIAM Garbutt ( 1888-1975) ‘Will’ : great grandson of Cpt William
married Blanche Snowdon (1888-1961)
Children:
Margaret Garbutt, later Carr (1914-2009)
William Garbutt (b1922) ‘Bill’: gt gt grandson of Cpt William.
married (Doris) Marjorie Walker (b1923)
Children: Barbara Jean (b 1950)

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The Lawson family history is complicated and has been subject of disputes over the centuries ( see post ‘Discord over Inheritance’). This first list indicates the line of the Lawsons who inherited estates and property and who were given the status of baronets which had been recognised ‘officially’.

EDMUND Lawson , Died 1551 Esquire of Byker & West Matsen manors in Northumberland & Durham
Married Margaret Swynhowe
Son and heir:

RALPH 1547-1623 Heir to above estates.
Married Elizabeth, heir to Manor of Burgh ( Brough) near Catterick, Yorkshire. Knighted by James I in 1603
Son & heir:

ROGER who died in his father’s lifetime c 1613/14. Married Dorothy Constable of Burton Constable Family, Yorkshire.
Son and heir to his grandfather Ralph’s estates:

HENRY 1602-1635 Married Ann
Various children including
JAMES Inherited Burgh( Brough) but only briefly, as he died young.
HENRY. Inherited from his brother James. He was a Colonel in the Royalist Army during the Civil War and died at the battle of Melton Mowbray in 1644. He had one daughter only.
His Heir:

JOHN LAWSON, 1st BARONET of Brough Hall, died 1698. Inherited from his brother Henry. He was a Captain of horse in the Royalist Army. His Estates were confiscated by the Parliamentarians after they had won the Civil War and he went into exile with his family. Upon the restoration of the monarchy his estates were restored and he was made a baronet in 1665 by Charles II.
Married Catherine Howard, (1637-1668), sister of Charles Ist Earl of Carlisle.
They had many children but only two surviving sons who married and had issue:

1.HENRY 2nd BARONET (1653-1726). 2. WiLLIAM. Esq of City of York
Married Elizabeth. D 1728
Son: Son:
JOHN. 3rd BARONET (1689-1739). George
This line continues in Lawson: part2

His son& heir:

HENRY 4th BART(1712-1769) married Anastasia Maire, heiress.

His son & heir
JOHN 5th BART (1744-1811).
No male heirs so title and estates pass to 5th Bart’s younger brother who was:

HENRY (“Maire” Lawson) 6th BART (1750-1834)
On his death, he had no male heirs to succeed. The estate passed to his great nephew through the female line, William Wright, who assumed the name Lawson. The first baronetcy lapsed but in 1841 William was created a baronet in the second creation:

WILLIAM (“Wright”) Lawson (1796-1865) 1st BART in second creation
His heir:

JOHN (1829-1910) 2nd BART in ditto

His heir:
HENRY Joseph (1877-1947). 3rd BART in ditto. Married Ursula Mary Howard, of Corby Castle Cumbria.

His heir:
RALPH Henry (1905-1975). 4th BART in ditto. He had no male heirs so Brough Castle was left to his two daughters, jointly.

His younger brother inherited the title of baronet and the seat moved to Corby Castle:
WILLIAM HOWARD-LAWSON (1907-1990) 5th BART in ditto.
His son and heir:
JOHN PHILIP Howard-Lawson (b 1934) 6th BART in ditto. He assumed the use of the Howard name and arms in 1962 by Royal License. He then resumed the use of the Lawson name in 1992.
He sold Corby Castle in 1994.

His son is:
PHILIP WILLIAM HOWARD

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